Home Reviews Review: Glass

Review: Glass

Samuel L. Jackson stars in Universal Pictures' GLASS

To this day, I’m one of those people who will tell you that Unbreakable is the best movie that M. Night Shyamalan has ever made. When looking at his history, that ended up not being all that difficult to accomplish, but it’s legitimately a good feature film. After so many years, I didn’t expect a pair of sequels in Split and Glass to follow it, but I was open to the possibilities. There were a lot of directions they could go, but I just wanted it to be good and deliver a valid payoff since it was being brought back to life.

In Glass, we find David Dunn (Bruce Willis) on the hunt for Kevin Wendell Crumb (James McAvoy) and his twenty-three other personalities. On his quest bring down the tortured soul, the hero who’s been generating buzz of his own is not only presented with the tough task of stopping a deranged mind. He’s also about to be brought face to face with Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson), the insanely brilliant and deadly mind he had locked away nearly two decades ago.

If and when you watch Glass, you will see what works and what doesn’t quite easily. In terms of its flaws, one of the first you’ll see comes in Shyamalan’s ability to create a balanced second act. Some of the content during this portion of the movie is exceptional, but the length of the act drags it down and will more than likely disappoint a good number of people.

While there are some necessary features included in this act help push things forward storywise, a lot of what we see during this time should have been removed completely. The reason for that is simply because this stuff isn’t needed at all. You could have eliminated all of the unnecessary additions and still had the exact same movie. Not only that, but you would obviously have delivered a much faster and smoother experience for viewers.

While the excess in the second act definitely does some damage, the main feature that was able to shine through in spite of it was the acting. Whether they had strong or weak material to work with, these guys manage to perform well throughout the entire picture. Because of the actors, I pretty much liked every character that we are able to meet. They basically took what they had and turned in some quality performances that will make you want to see more of them.

Unfortunately, since this is supposed to be the film that closes out a trilogy, I don’t think seeing any of them in the future is even possible. That in itself is a disappointment due to there being a lot more to explore with these characters. We’re given a chance to jump into the minds of each of these people as we try to understand why they are who they are, but we end up short on material. Having more movies to break them down could have been the way to go, but it’s not going to happen.

I think how it all ends will also be problematic for a large number of people. I wasn’t too fond of it myself when I first saw it, but thinking it over made it more palatable and easier to accept Shyamalan’s decision to finish things the way he did. Although I would have preferred a different ending, what was chosen was actually kind of bold and does tie everything in the trilogy together. Because it fits and because it’s kind of brave to end things this way, I somewhat appreciate the way it concludes.

The problems with Glass are impossible to ignore and detrimental to the overall film. However, there are enough positive things going on that prevent the movie from failing completely in my opinion. The bottom line is, some people will disagree with me and leave with a completely negative view of what they just watched. I can understand that because the problems are obvious and there was so much more that could have been done with the characters, the story, and the circumstances these guys face.

Rating: PG-13

Director: M. Night Shyamalan

Cast:
James McAvoy
Bruce Willis
Samuel L. Jackson
Anya Taylor-Joy
Sarah Paulson
Spencer Treat Clark
Charlayne Woodard

Film Length: 129 minutes

Release Date: January 18, 2019

Distributor: Universal Pictures

  • 6/10
    Score - 6/10
6/10
  • Pyotr Fedorov stars in IFC Midnight's SPUTNIK

    Review: Sputnik

    One thing that you’ll take away from Sputnik is that the people behind it wanted to …
  • Dan Stevens and Alison Brie star in IFC Films' THE RENTAL

    Review: The Rental

    The Rental is a pretty straightforward thriller in some ways. With its small budget and ca…
  • (L-R) Juliette Binoche, Catherine Deneuve, and Ethan Hawke star in IFC Films' THE TRUTH

    Review: The Truth (La Vérité)

    When hearing about Hirokazu Kore-eda’s project immediately following his film Shopli…
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars in Amazon Studios' 7500

    Review: 7500

    7500 is the type of film that’s set exclusively in one location. These kinds of pict…
  • Sierra McCormick and Jake Horowitz star in Amazon Prime's THE VAST OF NIGHT

    Review: The Vast of Night

    One rule that you learn about in filmmaking is the “show don’t tell” rul…
  • Image from IFC Midnight's THE WRETCHED

    Review: The Wretched

    I don’t understand why studios like IFC don’t take more chances on independent…
Load More Related Articles
Load More By Jaskee Hickman
  • Pyotr Fedorov stars in IFC Midnight's SPUTNIK

    Review: Sputnik

    One thing that you’ll take away from Sputnik is that the people behind it wanted to …
  • Dan Stevens and Alison Brie star in IFC Films' THE RENTAL

    Review: The Rental

    The Rental is a pretty straightforward thriller in some ways. With its small budget and ca…
  • Bella Heathcote stars in IFC Midnight's RELIC

    Review: Relic (2020)

    Relic should be a horror movie. It looks like a horror movie and feels like a horror movie…
  • (L-R) Juliette Binoche, Catherine Deneuve, and Ethan Hawke star in IFC Films' THE TRUTH

    Review: The Truth (La Vérité)

    When hearing about Hirokazu Kore-eda’s project immediately following his film Shopli…
  • Joseph Gordon-Levitt stars in Amazon Studios' 7500

    Review: 7500

    7500 is the type of film that’s set exclusively in one location. These kinds of pict…
  • Pete Davidson stars in Universal Pictures' THE KING OF STATEN ISLAND

    Review: The King of Staten Island

    I always worry about movies being longer than they need to be. That’s an issue that …
Load More In Reviews

Check Also

Attend A Virtual Screening of The Way I See It

CINEMATIC ESSENTIAL is offering you a chance to attend a virtual advance screening of Focu…